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Chief of the Hunkpapa Sioux

Wednesday
Jan 24, 2018

Quotes: 53419
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Random Person of the Day: Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull (Sioux: Tatanka Iyotake, Tatanka Iyotanka or Ta-Tanka I-Yotank, also nicknamed Slon-he or "Slow"; ca. 1831 - December 15, 1890) was a Hunkpapa Lakota Sioux holy man, born near the Grand River in South Dakota and killed by police on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation during an attempt to arrest him and prevent him from supporting the Ghost Dance movement.

He is notable in American and Native American history for his role in the major victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn against Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment on June 25, 1876, where Sitting Bull's premonition of defeating the cavalry became reality. In the months after the battle, Sitting Bull fled the United States to Canada, where he remained until 1881, at which time he surrendered to American forces. After his return to the United States, he briefly toured as a performer in Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show.

After working as a performer, Sitting Bull returned to the Standing Rock Agency in South Dakota. Because of fears that he would use his influence to support the Ghost Dance movement, Indian Affairs authorities ordered his arrest. During an ensuing struggle between Sitting Bull's followers and the police, Sitting Bull was shot in the side and head by police after they were fired upon by his supporters. His body was taken to nearby Fort Yates for burial, but in 1953, his remains possibly were exhumed and reburied near Mobridge, South Dakota by Sioux who wanted his body to be nearer to his birthplace. However, some Sioux and historians dispute this claim and believe that any remains that were moved were not those of Sitting Bull.

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